How do wireless charging mats work?

Thursday 29th July 2010
Submitted by nikkiwithers
Anon

Wireless charging mats allow you to power-up multiple gadgets all at once by simply resting them on the surface, eliminating the need for tangled wires and device-specific adaptors. They work thanks to a process known as magnetic induction, the same method used to charge electrical toothbrushes, which employs an electromagnetic field to transfer energy between two objects.
According to Faraday’s law of induction, a current is produced when a conductive substance passes through a magnetic field. So the electromagnetic force created in the mat induces a current in the device you’re charging.
In future, manufacturers plan to integrate the technology into the gadgets, as well as domestic surfaces and furniture, so you can just drop your gadgets on the kitchen table and leave them to charge. For now, though, your gadgets have to be slipped into special cases that will enable wireless charging.

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