Why do children always have so much energy?

Friday 5th February 2010
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Asked by: Matthew Pritchard, Scotland

Partly because they have so much to learn and need to rush around finding out as much as possible, and partly because they don’t have the responsibilities and long days that make so many adults feel tired by comparison. Also, as we get older, our muscles get weaker and our joints hurt more, so we get jealous of all that childhood energy.
Answered by Susan Blackmore

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