Fujifilm develop camera with X-ray vision © Fujifilm

Fujifilm develop camera with X-ray vision

The Fujifilm X-T1 IR is a new digital camera with an alarming feature – it sees through your clothes.

The Fujifilm X-T1 IR is a new digital camera with an alarming feature – it sees through your clothes.

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Unlike other cameras, the new Fujifilm X-T1 IR can detect infrared light, allowing it to see things invisible to the naked eye. Unfortunately, this means it can see through clothes too.

However, to calm fears regarding the potential misuse of this feature, Fujifilm claim that it is in fact really designed for scientists. The infrared aspect will allow doctors to examine soft tissue damage and make diagnoses of their patients.

Furthermore, forensic scientists can use the camera to detect clues at crime scenes. Infrared light gives indications of temperature meaning that items recently kept in pockets can be identified. It can even reveal bloodstains that have been covered by substances such as paint.

The camera can also be used to determine the authenticity of artwork by highlighting sketches under the surface of paintings.

An infrared (IR) photograph of a tree (Dschwen/Wikimedia Commons)
An infrared (IR) photograph of a tree (Dschwen/Wikimedia Commons)

The X-T1 IR looks identical to its predecessor, the X-T1, but uses a sensor that detects light wavelengths between 380 and 1000nm. This range is much wider than most cameras, as well as the human eye, which can see light between 380 and 700nm.

The array of wavelengths recognised by the camera includes infrared, visible and ultraviolet light, allowing the capture of dreamlike psychedelic photographs, such as trees that appear white and cloud-like, rather than sharp and green.

The Fujifilm X-T1 IR is set to be released in October, retailing at £1,100, and will be the first camera of its kind available to the masses.


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