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Stephen Hawking (1942-2018): the theoretical physicist’s life in pictures

He was one of the world's most famous and important scientists, changing the way we understand the Universe, all while living most of his life with motor neurone disease - here’s the renowned theoretical physicist's life in pictures.

Professor Stephen Hawking

Professor Stephen Hawking, the renowned theoretical physicist famed for his work on black holes and the Big Bang, as well as publishing the popular science book A Brief History of Timehas died at the age of 76.

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Cosmologist Stephen Hawking on 10 October 1979 in Princeton, New Jersey, USA © Santi Visalli/Getty Images
Cosmologist Stephen Hawking on 10 October 1979 in Princeton, New Jersey, USA © Santi Visalli/Getty Images

Undergraduate study

Stephen William Hawking was born on 8 January 1942 in Oxford, England to Frank and Isobel Hawking. He had two younger sisters, Philippa and Mary, and an adopted brother, Edward.

As an undergraduate, Hawking attended Oxford University and received a first-class honours degree in Natural Sciences, although he claimed to have studied for only 1,000 hours to achieve it.

© Terry Smith/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images
© Terry Smith/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images

Hawking the cosmologist

As a postgraduate student at Cambridge University, Hawking began working on cosmic singularities – points in space-time that have zero volume and infinite gravitational strength, predicted to exist according to Albert Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity.

Inspired by Roger Penrose’s theory that singularities exist at the centre of black holes, Hawking applied the same concept to the Universe, concluding that it must have started in such a singularity: the Big Bang.

Professor Stephen Hawking in his office at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge, circa 1990 © Romano Cagnoni/Getty Images
Professor Stephen Hawking in his office at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge, circa 1990 © Romano Cagnoni/Getty Images

Motor neurone disease takes hold

During his time at Cambridge Stephen Hawking was diagnosed with motor neurone disease, also known as, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although he was expected to live for only two more years, he lived on for over 50 years, becoming one of the foremost figures in science.

© In Pictures Ltd./Corbis via Getty Images
© In Pictures Ltd./Corbis via Getty Images

Hawking Radiation

In 1974, Hawking published a paper showing that quantum effects around black holes leads them to emit radiation (later dubbed ‘Hawking Radiation’), shrink, and explode. Such radiation or explosions have never been detected, but the theoretical link he demonstrated between thermodynamics, quantum theory and gravity is still being explored, and may well be crucial to an ultimate theory of everything.

Stephen Hawking and wife Elaine Mason, 2004 © Dave Benett/Getty Images
Stephen Hawking and wife Elaine Mason, 2004 © Dave Benett/Getty Images

Personal life

Stephen Hawking met his first wife, Jane Wilde, when at Cambridge and they were married in 1965. As his disease worsened, the weight of looking after their three children, Robert, Lucy and Timothy, took its toll on their marriage and the couple separated in 1995. He soon after married his nurse Elaine Mason, although they too divorced in 2006.

© Alamy
© Alamy

A Brief History Of Time

In 1988, Hawking’s landmark book A Brief History Of Time was published. This exploration of space, time and black holes brought cosmology to the masses and would go on to sell more than 10 million copies.

© INTRO/Peter Himsel/ullstein bild via Getty Images
© INTRO/Peter Himsel/ullstein bild via Getty Images

The Grand Design

The publication of The Grand Design in 2010, co-authored with Leonard Mlodinow, claimed to provide “answers to the ultimate questions of life”. Evolutionary biologist and outspoken atheist Richard Dawkins said of the book “Darwinism kicked God out of biology but physics remained more uncertain. Hawking is now administering the coup de grace.”

© Alamy
© Alamy

Popular culture

A keen fan of science fiction and popular culture, Stephen Hawking appeared in many TV shows, including Star Trek: The Next GenerationThe SimpsonsFuturama, and The Big Bang Theory.

Stephen Hawking attends the EE British Academy Film Awards at The Royal Opera House on 8 February 2015 © Mike Marsland/WireImage
Stephen Hawking attends the EE British Academy Film Awards at The Royal Opera House on 8 February 2015 © Mike Marsland/WireImage

Lesser known works

Although less familiar to the public, Hawking worked on aspects of quantum gravity, aiming for a so-called ‘theory of everything’ that unifies the incompatible theories of the very small (quantum physics) and very large (the General Theory of Relativity).

His first significant work in this area in 1980 was in support of a now-dismissed theory named ‘N=8 Supergravity’. Unlike other theories linked to the idea of fundamental particles having ‘supersymmetric’ partners, this had the advantage of only requiring four dimensions of space and time.

More recently, Hawking focused his ‘theory of everything’ efforts on string theory.

Oil sketch by Yolanda Sonnabend for a portrait in the National Portrait Gallery, London. Stephen Hawking © Science Museum/SSPL/Getty Images
Oil sketch by Yolanda Sonnabend for a portrait in the National Portrait Gallery, London. Stephen Hawking © Science Museum/SSPL/Getty Images

The future of humanity

Stephen Hawking frequently raised concerns about the future of humanity and in 2006 issued the first of his warnings on risks for human survival, ranging from nuclear self-destruction and being dominated by AI to alien invaders.

Eddie Redmayne and Stephen Hawking attend the UK Premiere of The Theory Of Everything © Mike Marsland/WireImage
Eddie Redmayne and Stephen Hawking attend the UK Premiere of The Theory Of Everything © Mike Marsland/WireImage

Life in film

In 2014, Hawking was portrayed by Eddie Redmayne in the Bafta award-winning film The Theory Of Everything, based on the book Travelling To Infinity by Hawking’s ex-wife Jane. It is not the first time his life was portrayed in film, Benedict Cumberbatch played him in the 2004 BBC film Hawking.

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Campaigner

Although Hawking’s condition with motor neuron disease steadily deteriorated, he was a strong patron of disability outreach. As well as fighting to protect disability rights and the right to die for the terminally ill, he also narrated the opening ceremonyof the London 2012 Paralympic Games, accepted the Ice Bucket Challenge and has even experienced weightlessness.

Stephen Hawking and others attend the New Space Exploration Initiative 'Breakthrough Starshot' Announcement at One World Observatory on 12 April 2016 in New York City, USA © Gary Gershoff/WireImage
Stephen Hawking and others attend the New Space Exploration Initiative ‘Breakthrough Starshot’ Announcement at One World Observatory on 12 April 2016 in New York City, USA © Gary Gershoff/WireImage

The hunt for extra-terrestrial life

In April 2016, Stephen Hawking, along with Yuri Milner and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg announced Breakthrough Starshot, an ambitious project to send tiny StarChips to Alpha Centauri in the hunt for extra terrestrials.

Professor Stephen Hawking, British theoretical physicist. Photographed at the Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge © Eleanor Bentall/Corbis via Getty Images
Professor Stephen Hawking, British theoretical physicist. Photographed at the Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge © Eleanor Bentall/Corbis via Getty Images

Stephen Hawking (1942-2018)

Hawking died peacefully in his sleep on the morning of Wednesday 14 March 2018.


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