In pictures: The 2020 Super Pink Moon lights up April skies

People have been grabbing cameras and smartphones to try and record the lunar light show.

Stargazing enthusiasts have been marvelling at the emergence of a pink supermoon in the night skies over the UK and the world.

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Despite its name, there will not be any noticeable colour difference to the full moon, which is due to reach its peak during the early hours of Wednesday at 03.55 BST.

The pink supermoon name is a northern Native American reference to an early-blooming wildflower, which starts to pop up in the US and Canada at the beginning of spring.

In some other cultures, the Pink Moon is known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and the Fish Moon.

As this will also be a supermoon, people can expect it to look up to 14 per cent bigger and 30 per cent brighter in the sky as it reaches its closest point to Earth, known as its perigee.

April’s supermoon is the third of the year, following the worm moon on 9 March.

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The next full Moon is referred to as the Flower Moon, which takes place on 7 May 2020.

Pictures of the April 2020 Super Pink Moon

A super moon, also called full pink moon, rises above central London on 07 April, 2020 in London, England. The April supermoon is the biggest and brightest in 2020 as it's orbit is at its closest distance from the Earth at around 357,042 km.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Wiktor Szymanowicz / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Wiktor Szymanowicz/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
The Super Pink Moon rises over the Shard in London © Wiktor Szymanowicz/Barcroft Media via Getty Images
A pink supermoon is seen over Belvoir castle in Leicestershire © Danny Lawson/PA
Belvoir castle in Leicestershire © Danny Lawson/PA
A pink supermoon is seen setting behind the rooftops in Edinburgh © PA
The Pink Supermoon is seen setting behind the rooftops in Edinburgh © PA
Moon during the Largest supermoon 2020 at the Amsterdam on April 7, 2020 in Amsterdam Netherlands (Photo by Soccrates Images/Getty Images)
The Pink Super Moon rises over Amsterdam © Soccrates Images/Getty Images
A full moon shining over the Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the city of Zaslavl. Natalia Fedosenko/TASS (Photo by Natalia FedosenkoTASS via Getty Images)
A full moon shining over the Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Belarus © Natalia Fedosenko\TASS via Getty Images
Kremlevskaya Embankment. Valery Sharifulin/TASS (Photo by Valery SharifulinTASS via Getty Images)
The Kremlevskaya Embankment in Moscow © Valery Sharifulin/TASS via Getty Images
the Reichstag Building on April 07, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. Today's super pink moon is the biggest and closest supermoon of the year of the year (Photo by Maja Hitij/Getty Images)
The Reichstag Building in Berlin, Germany © Maja Hitij/Getty Images

Learn more about the 2020 pink moon from History Extra and BBC Sky at Night Magazine:

Supermoon is seen with a house in Ankara, Turkey on April 7, 2020. The Supermoon is a full moon that almost coincides with the closest distance that the Moon reaches to Earth in its elliptic orbit, resulting in a larger-than-usual visible size of the lunar disk as seen from Earth. (Photo by Ercin Top/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
Ankara, Turkey © Ercin Top/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
The full moon over the spire of the Kotelnicheskaya Embankment Building. Mikhail Metzel/TASS (Photo by Mikhail MetzelTASS via Getty Images)
The Kotelnicheskaya Embankment Building in Moscow, Russia © Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images
A bald eagle sits near its nest while the super pink moon rises in the distance at Chatfield State Park in Littleton, Colorado on Tuesday, April 7, 2020. Photo by Eric Lutzens/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images
A bald eagle sits near its nest at Chatfield State Park in Littleton, Colorado, USA © Eric Lutzens/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images
Supermoon is seen with Selimiye and Uc Serefeli Mosques in Edirne, Turkey on April 7, 2020. Supermoon is a full moon that almost coincides with the closest distance that the Moon reaches to Earth in its elliptic orbit, resulting in a larger-than-usual visible size of the lunar disk as seen from Earth. (Photo by Gokhan Balci/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
The Selimiye and Uc Serefeli Mosques in Edirne, Turkey © Gokhan Balci/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
People gather to view the full moon on a bridge near the Bund on April 07, 2020 in Shanghai, China. Health authorities of China said the country has passed the peak of the COVID-19 epidemic on March 12. As of today, the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has infected more than 1,362,000 people and killed over 76,000 globally. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak a pandemic on March 11. (Photo by Yves Dean/Getty Images)
The Bund in Shanghai, China © Yves Dean/Getty Images
The Super Pink Moon rises behind the Empire State in New York City lit to honor COVID-19 healthworkers on April 7, 2020 as seen from Union City, New Jersey. (Photo by Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)
The Empire State in New York City lit to honour COVID-19 healthworkers © Gary Hershorn/Getty Images
The supermoon rises over the Santa Maria della Salute church during the lockdown of the city on April 07, 2020 in Venice, Italy. There have been well over 100,000 reported COVID-19 cases in Italy and more than 15,000 related deaths, but the officials are confident the peak of new cases has passed. (Photo by Simone Padovani/Awakening/Getty Images)
The Santa Maria della Salute church in Venice, Italy © Simone Padovani/Awakening/Getty Images
A view of a full moon over a monument titled “To the Conquerors of the Near Universe” by Soviet sculptor Boris Yedunov dedicated to Soviet cosmonauts Alexei Leonov, Yuri Romanenko, Viktor Patsayev, and Alexander Viktorenko © Vitaly Nevar/TASS via Getty Images

Reader Q&A: Why is the Moon sometimes visible during the day?

Asked by: Fatima, Manchester

In fact, the Moon is visible in daylight almost every day. The Earth’s daily revolution on its axis means that the Moon is actually above the horizon for about 12 hours out of every 24. Usually, some portion of that time will be during daylight – you just need to look carefully, because its brightness is so much less than the Sun’s.

The only times you won’t be able to see it during the day are near a new Moon, when it is positioned too close to the Sun in the sky to be seen, and near a full Moon, when it rises at sunset and sets at sunrise, so is only visible during the hours of darkness.

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