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Why do we dream more in some places than others? © Getty Images

Why do we dream more in some places than others?

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Feeling sleepy? When people travel they often feel like they have dreamt more.

Asked by: Charlie Mack, Uckfield

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Dreams most commonly occur during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, and are easier to remember if we wake during this stage of sleep or soon afterwards. Evolutionary theories emphasise the need to feel safe in order to lose vigilance and go to sleep, so we may sleep less well in a novel environment, or in rooms that are too hot, cold, noisy or uncomfortable. When we wake up more frequently during the night, we are more likely to remember our dreams. This gives us the impression that we dream more in certain places than others.


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Authors

Alice is a Professor of Psychology at Goldsmiths. She has contributed to several diverse research areas, including the longitudinal associations between sleep and psychopathology, behavioural genetics, sleep paralysis and exploding head syndrome. In addition to her scientific contributions she also excels in the public engagement of science. She has published two popular science book (Nodding Off, Bloomsbury, 2018 and Sleepy Pebble, Nobrow, 2019). She regularly contributes articles to the media and has had her work published in outlets including the Guardian, GQ UK, Sud Ouest, Slate Fr, Independent.

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