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Why do we get blisters. © Getty Images

Why do we get blisters?

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Step away from the scissors.

Asked by: Paul Layfield, via email

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Blisters are one of the skin’s ways of protecting itself from harm, such as excessive friction (new shoes that rub), burns, irritating substances or allergies. Fluid collects between the outermost skin layer – the epidermis – and the layer below – the dermis – which are usually firmly connected. This bubble of fluid, most often a clear liquid called ‘serum’, shields the skin structures below from further damage, allowing healing. So as tempting as it is, it’s best not to pop a blister.

Why do I get cramp in my feet when I'm just lying in bed? © Getty Images

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