If the brain has no pain receptors, why do I get headaches? © Getty Images

If the brain has no pain receptors, why do I get headaches?

Although it may feel like your brain hurts during a migraine, it’s the tissues surrounding it that are sensitive to pain.

Asked by: Joel Taylor, Willand

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That’s why they are called headaches, not brainaches! Although the brain doesn’t sense pain directly, it is surrounded by membranes, blood vessels and muscles that do. Ordinary tension headaches are caused by the muscles in your scalp and neck.

The origin of the pain in a migraine headache isn’t fully understood yet, but it may come from the arteries that supply the brain. The brain is just bad at locating the origin of these signals.


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